Parks and Recreation

To preserve, protect, maintain and enhance the city's parklands and recreational facilities and engage people in leisure activities that contribute to their quality of life.

Conservation

Initiatives &Topics

The City of St. Petersburg is commmitted to the preservation of our parkland, protection of our water sources, wildlife and community resources.

Wilderness Preserves provide opportunities for research as well as conservation. St. Petersburg has 8 Wilderness Preserves.

Seabird Sanctuary

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Animal Services - coyotes, dangerous dogs, lost pets public nuisance, spay & neuter, training

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Living with Wildlife - sea turtles, black bears, panthers, gators and crocodiles, shorebirds, sandhill cranes, owls, manatee, snakes

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African Honey Bee in Florida - all about

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Dead Animal Removal

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Prescribed Fire and Wildfire Information

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Where does your stormwater go?

Green Energy, food, buildings, water conservation, renewable energy & efficiency. Florida's First Green City

Tree City USA 26 Years

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Where do I recycle? Recycling Programs

Landscaping, Irrigation, Vegetation Maintenance, Tree and Mangrove Protection Municipal Code Chapter 16

Water Resources Water restrictions and water conservation programs




Parks, Preserves and Estuaries

Parks
The city of St. Petersburg is proud of its public park system. Within the city you will enjoy approximately 2,300 acres of public land dedicated to parks and recreation in 137 parks, including the award-winning Boyd Hill Nature Preserve and the new Lake Maggiore Environmental Education Center, historic Sunken Gardens, Dell Holmes Park and the Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum. Our city owned parkland includes fitness trails; picnic parks; playground areas; dog parks; skate parks; athletic fields, and beach areas.

Since the early 1900s, the city has had one of the finest waterfront park systems in the Southeastern United States, if not the entire country, a design feature ensuring downtown St. Petersburg's enduring charm for future generations.

Preserves
The city of St. Petersburg has three (3) nature preserves within its borders:

Boyd Hill Nature Preserve
Boyd Hill Nature Preserve is a 245-acre park on the shores of Lake Maggiore that offers more than three miles of trails and boardwalks, five (5) ecosystems, including hardwood hammocks, pine scrub, pine flatwoods and lakeshore; and interpretive programming. The Preserve also offers an Environmental Study Program and Education Center. A major cleanup of the lake bed in 2004-2005 improved its water quality and habitat.

Clam Bayou Preserve Clam Bayou Preserve is located in southwest St. Petersburg offering hiking, canoeing and kayaking. The Southwest Florida Water Management District's (SWFWMD) Surface Water and Improvement and Management (SWIM) Program recently initiated the Clam Bayou Stormwater and Habitat Restoration Project, which involves the design and construction of three (3) stormwater treatment areas and an 87-acre habitat restoration project on property purchased by the District and the City of St. Petersburg. Additionally, the Clam Bayou Marine Education Center will be the site of a demonstration project focusing on the environmental and economic value of creating and maintaining a native Florida landscape. Components of this project include planting native, drought-resistant plants, creating footpaths of porous materials, producing plant identification guides and developing educational curriculum.

Weedon Island Preserve Weedon Island Preserve is owned by the state of Florida and managed by the Pinellas County Parks Department under a lease agreement with the state. The Island was included on the National Register of Historic Sites in 1972 and purchased by the state in 1974 with funds from the State's Endangered Lands Program. The preserve offers a cultural and natural history center to interpret the thousands of years of human habitation in Pinellas County.

Estuaries
Tampa Bay is the largest estuary in the state of Florida, encompassing 400 square miles of open water and 2,300 square miles of highly developed watershed that supports industry, agriculture and a diverse population n excess of 2.4 million people. Estuaries like Tampa Bay are among the diverse and productive ecosystems in the world. More than 70 percent of all fish, shellfish, and crustaceans spend some part of their lives in the protected waters of estuaries like Tampa Bay. Residents from the Manatee River to Clearwater Harbor and from Hillsborough Bay to the Gulf of Mexico depend on Tampa Bay for commercial and recreational activities.

St. Petersburg has nearly 300 linear miles of shoreline that rims Tampa Bay and Boca Ciega Bay. Protecting them from point and non-point pollution will enhance those resources for environmental and recreational use for future generations to come. The city has developed a list of projects that focus on reducing nitrogen in order to improve our bay water quality.

REPORT A BURMESE PYTHON

You can call the FWC’s Exotic Species Hotline at 888-IVE-GOT1 (888- 483-4681) and report a Burmese python. The hotline is answered part-time by a live operator and has a voicemail system that will prompt you for information about your sighting and your contact information if the operator is unable to answer the call. For more information visit the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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